Question: How To Draw A Realistic Steam Train Step By Step?

How to Draw a Classic Steam Locomotive From Scratch

The steam engine has been used by man since the 19th century, and its design, size, and speed continue to fascinate successive generations. In this tutorial, we’ll learn how to draw one of these mighty machines from the past.

Step 1

We want to make this train quite imposing, and we’ll need a low horizon to achieve that, so we’ll start with a simple line.

Step 2

For this image, we’ll use a two-point perspective setup, which may require the use of two pieces of masking tape on either side of your canvas and the addition of both points with a ruler.

Step 3

We’ll use our horizon line and vanishing points to draw a large box, with the shape of the box created by drawing a straight line from the right vanishing point. We can now use these lines to draw the guide for our engine, as well as the outline of the engine.

Step 5

When we add two more lines from this vanishing point, we get the shape of an X.

Step 6

We’ve just drawn two lines below the right-hand horizon line, leading from this second point across the page, and now we’ll move to the left-hand vanishing point and draw a line below it, leading from there to the second vanishing point on the next page.

Step 8

Draw four vertical lines across the top and bottom of the image from left to right to complete the box.

Step 9

Because most steam engines of this type are high-sided and tall, it may appear unusual at first, but it’ll all be worth it in the end.

Step 1

In terms of lines, colors, and shapes, how do you depict the engine and cab car?

Step 2

Next, draw a line from the right hand side of the circle to the left vanishing point, which will be the location of our boiler and firebox.

Step 3

Draw a circle around the center of a circle, then a second smaller circle within the first, and a third smaller circle to fill in the gap between the two circles at the very front of the circle.

Step 4

The engine’s chassis and running gear are beneath the boiler, and to make them, we’ll draw a long box the same length as the boiler.

Step 5

Keep perspective in mind when drawing this, as it’s very easy to make a mistake here that will ruin the piece. A wide rectangle at the very front of the engine will become the front buffer beam – keep this in mind when drawing this.

Step 6

Draw two small triangles beneath the boiler that will serve as the first of a series of supports that will run the length of the boiler and be attached to the chassis; these can be made with simple triangles by starting with a circle.

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Step 7

The cab section is made up of a tall cylindrical section connected to the boiler by a metal frame. At the front of the boiler is a tall box that runs level with the top, but slightly overlaps; this will be fixed when we work on the details of this section in the near future.

Step 8

Remember to include the side window in the cab; a slightly skewed square will suffice.

Step 9

The fire box is located between the boiler and the cab section of the locomotive; there isn’t much to distinguish it, but it does have a small sloping section that connects the two parts and runs across the boiler on both sides of the locomotive.

Step 10

Remember to include the funnel and dome on top of the boiler; due to the perspective we’re using, much of these two will be hidden, but what is visible must be included!

Step 11

Now that we’ve got all of our main details in place, we can start putting them all together; you’ll notice that there are still a lot of minor details to add, but they’ll come!

Step 1

Because this engine is built for speed, the tender is the small second trailer that runs behind locomotives of this type. The tender is the same height and width as the engine and is designed to run hand in hand with the engine. We’ll start with a simple box.

Step 2

A smaller box will be drawn below our first for a set of small wheels that will support the tender.

Step 3

There is an opening at the top of the tender to allow coal to be loaded on board; due to perspective, not much of this opening can be seen, but it is visible towards the back.

Step 4

There is a slight cutaway towards the top of the tender on this locomotive to allow the drivers and firemen to easily get on and off the loco as well as observe things ahead and behind when in motion, so remember to draw this in as we progress.

Step 5

The tender’s wheels have no connecting rods or pistons, and are only connected by axles and suspension parts, which we can make by drawing a series of downward pointing triangles one after the other.

Step 6

Then, below the triangles, draw several small boxes that will serve as suspension springs, followed by the wheels.

Step 1

It’s a good idea to practice drawing circles and ellipses before moving on to the next section, as you’ll need to be able to do so to complete the steps that follow.

Step 2

Starting at the front of the train and working backwards, we’ll draw three small ellipses to represent the leading wheels; there are two wheels on the opposite side as well, but one is hidden by the running gear in the engine’s center.

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Step 3

The main driving wheels are located behind these leading wheels, and there are six of them on this type of engine, three on each side.

Step 4

We are now drawing the small trailing wheel at the very back of the engine, as well as another on the opposite side.

Step 5

A second circle inside the first will be used for an inner rim on all of the wheels.

Step 6

Because some of the spokes of the wheels are obscured by perspective, it may appear as if they aren’t there, but they are, so we’ll start with the small leading wheels and work our way backward.

Step 7

The larger driving wheels will have even more spokes obscured by the driving rods, but drawing the spokes in now will be easier in the long run.

Step 8

After we’ve finished with the spokes, we’ll move on to the driving and connecting rods, which are a little more complicated because they must pivot and rise and fall at the same time. To begin, draw a small series of long boxes at various angles.

Step 9

The pivots are at the ends of some of the rods, and you can draw them with small ellipses and cylinders, erasing the parts that will be attached to your rods.

Step 10

Remember to include the numerous bolts that hold everything together!

Step 11

We must not forget the trailing wheels on the engine and tender to complete the running gear, and drawing ellipses will help you here as well.

Step 12

Add all the connecting rods and suspension parts that are fitted to these after you have all the wheels in place; remember, there is no drive going to them, so don’t add any more driving rods, but the locomotive must remain stable as it travels at speed!

Step 1

We’ll start at the front of the engine and draw in the buffers that protect it from major knocks now that we’ve assembled all of the main parts for our train.

Step 2

The connecting hook and chain are then placed between the two buffers, which are essential when towing carriages or wagons.

Step 3

The brake hoses and lamp lines are also located in the center of the buffer bar, but they must be placed on either side of the connecting hook.

Step 4

Add the locking mechanism and name plate to the engine’s front access dooru2014that is, if your engine has one! There are also some name plates above the middle driving wheel on this particular engine.

Step 5

There are some additional side plates on either side of the front of the boiler that can be removed if necessary, but we’ll leave them in place for now.

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Step 6

Keeping with the boiler, we’ll need to add a series of lines that define the outer sections of this part of the engine; keep in mind that the size and space of each of these lines varies due to perspective, and remembering small details like this will help your drawing look more realistic!

Step 7

Several hand rails that run down the side of the boiler and tender must be included.

Step 8

Guards are on the tops of the main driving wheels, and they must be installed next.

Step 9

Surprisingly, there are two sets of steps that need to be added to the engine: one at the front and one at the cab end!

Step 10

The housing for the piston and cylinder that transfer all of the steam pressure from the boiler to the wheels, which appears to be an ordinary box but is actually “U” shaped to allow the two large pistons inside to work properly, is located ahead of the driving rods.

Step 11

There is a small window in the front of the cab that allows the drivers to see what is ahead, and there are two more on either side of the boiler, so don’t forget to close them.

Step 12

Any remaining finishing touches that are currently missing must be added at this time, and if desired, you can add your own personal touches to make your locomotive truly unique!

Step 13

It’s now just a matter of tidying up your drawing and removing any remaining construction lines.

Awesome Work, You’re Done!

If you’re feeling brave, you can even add a splash of color to your creation; the color scheme is entirely up to you! I hope you’ve enjoyed this artistic journey through rail history; by following the principles and tips discussed in this tutorial, you can help keep it alive as well!

How do you draw steam?

Draw a few S or C-shaped curves over the item that is steaming. Because steam has an amorphous shape, you can be creative, but make sure the curves are generally going upwards unless it is windy or the object is moving.

How do you draw a simple train?

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Draw two rectangles for the cars.
  2. Add the train’s front.
  3. Add the train car doors.
  4. Draw a series of windows.
  5. Add lines to connect the cars.
  6. Add the rails.
  7. Connect the train to rails with many wheels.
  8. Add landscaping to the fore and background.

How do you draw a simple electric train?

Electric trains travel at a thousand times the speed of conventional thermal trains.

  1. Draw an oval to represent an electric train.

Does the Flying Scotsman still run?

The National Railway Museum now owns the Flying Scotsman, which Riley operates and maintains.

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